The Upside Down Homes

Roland Bull Roland Bull
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Designed by Clear Architects in Essex, UK, the Upside Down Homes present a novel alternative to traditional warehouse conversions, in which the living quarters are usually located on the ground floor, with the upper levels partitioned to accommodate bedrooms. 

Originally a former Victorian warehouse, the building now plays host to two luxury residential homes. Each has been constructed with stunning open plan living areas that take advantage of rustic, exposed beams, and a raft of windows to invite light into the space.

Crowning the homes is a newly added rooftop terrace, with a stunning, modern stairwell providing the perfect means of ascension to enjoy the summer sun from a private area.

Let's take a tour and witness the impressive transformation of a once derelict warehouse into two stylish modern houses.

Classic façade

From the street, the façade of this Victorian construction appears classic and understated. Its length and continuity draw the eye, with a generous array of Georgian windows peering out into the neighbourhood. 

The Upside Down Homes are mirrored on the left and right hand sides of the building. Sleek wood and glass doors at the end of long, paved paths await visitors, providing a warm invitation to enter and explore.

Let's have a look inside one of them…

Luminous interior

Upon entering this home the allure of warmth and length continues, with a beautiful, glowing corridor streaming through to the space beyond. Lighting creeps out from alcoves hidden in the ceiling and floor, providing an almost space-age ambience as it reflects from white surfaces and support beams and over the buffed, metal wall opposite. 

The soft tones of the wooden floor and doorway draw the space back into the present, inviting us to continue our tour of this unique property. 

Harmonious black and white

Moving through to the master bedroom and we gain our first glimpse of the prevailing colour scheme throughout this stylish space. The duality of black and white draws the eye and ties beautifully to the theme of opposites being presented within the Upside Down Homes. 

Pale, wooden doors provide a subtle break from the black and white decor, while the diagonal slats add a modern feel to the traditional use of wood. The bathroom once again plays with opposing forces, with the black tiles lining the floor and walls standing in contrast to their white trimming and to the bathroom fittings, creating a striking inversion of the remainder of the home's interior design.

Subtly industrial

The sheen of buffed metal draws us up the stairs to the living area, with warm underfoot lighting guiding our steps after dark. The subtly industrial effect pays gentle homage to the building's beginnings as a factory space. 

The pale feel of the materials used here creates a light and uplifting effect, perfect for when the filtering sun has difficulty reaching the lower levels of the home.

White, bright and expansive

The living areas within the Upside Down Homes are elevated, bright and breathtaking. 

The exposed beams of the factory have been painted black to accentuate the duality of design so prevalent throughout the homes. The white expanse capitalises on the impressive space found within industrial buildings, with light flooding in through overhead windows.

Best of all, the living areas provide ample room for creative and adaptable furnishings, allowing the occupants to endow their living quarters with a unique personality, that can be adjusted to suit any purpose or occasion.

Depth of colour

From this vantage we gain another view of the living space and the beautiful geometry of strong, exposed beams. The kitchen area presents its own white sheen, with the deep crimson underside of the bench providing a warming colour contrast from the stark black and white dominating the remainder on the space. 

A smooth, white bench top and silver fittings add to the modern air of the property, with understated sophistication permeating the home.

Rooftop terrace

This beautiful view of the smooth, wooden stairwell showcases of the importance of lighting within the Upside Down Homes. The stairs lead quietly up to the rooftop terrace beyond, with their warm curve illuminated underfoot by soft lighting.

With the bedrooms located on the ground floor it is important that light is able to flow throughout the entire house, with sunshine steaming downwards through the windows framed overhead.

The softness of the space is palpable, with the stark black frames providing a strong contrast to the white walls and subdued textures of the stairwell.

For more ideas for renovating industrial-style buildings have a look at Before & After: Renovation Of An Old Mill!

What's your favourite design feature in the Upside Down Homes? Tell us below!
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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