Wood Green House: modern Houses by Satish Jassal Architects

London family home design—magical interior solutions

Luke Riley Luke Riley
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Every inch of space is precious in our modern metropolises, no more so than in London. As a result, we have seen developers, local councils and homeowners showing immense creativity in finding housing solutions in a city where new land assigned to housing is rare. 

In an incredible feat of home design, a family home has been designed on an awkward site wedged between a house and a block of flats. The plot is so slight and insubstantial that most passersby would barely notice it, let alone imagine a house being built upon it!

Scroll down to see the eye-opening pictures captured throughout all stages of the project. 

Before: Seizing an opportunity

We head to the bustling North London district of Wood Green to find the project in question. Blink and you'll miss the plot where the future home is be situated, in the tiny space behind where the timber fence borders the townhouse. 

The owners of the house adjacent to the plot approached experts from Satish Jassal Architects to design a house there.

After: Fitting right in

Somehow, the architects were able to squeeze a sizeable family home within that tiny gap between the two neighbouring properties. In a slight departure to the neighbourhood's character, the building takes on a contemporary style, which is highlighted by its staggered form and unique material palette. 

Staffordshire blue slate was chosen for the base, providing the lower volume with a stylish aesthetic. A natural contrast is gained with the upper-level being clad in oak panels. 

After: Thinking of the neighbours

The wedge shaped plot runs closely between the row of terraces and the block of flats built in the 1980s. Naturally, it was a difficult task for the architects to design a home that wouldn't negatively affect neighbouring properties and their tenants. Issues regarding privacy loss, overshadowing and access to natural light were all considered in the design details. 

The location of windows were critical to the success of the planning application, with all the home's windows being located strategically at the front and rear ends of the building.  There are no windows on the two sides of the volume, helping to avoid any issues of privacy loss to the neighbouring property. 

After: Private oasis

The rear elevation’s strong angles are defined by timber, glass and the blue slate. Up on the first-floor a balcony overlooks the large rear garden, which is connected to the inside via a bespoke oak and glass conservatory.

A communal zone on the ground-floor is linked directly to a timber-framed terrace, offering a unique outdoor dining experience to the very lucky owners.

Before: Solving the puzzle

This computer generated graphic highlights the challenging nature of this project, while also highlighting how it was all made possible by Satish Jassal Architects

This two-storey addition comprises of a main bedroom with en suite, kitchen, laundry, bathroom, living areas and second bedroom, all within the awkward footprint. It is quite an accomplishment considering all the inhibiting factors involved in the process. 

After: Hidden innovation

It comes as no surprise to us that a housing project like this popped up on our radar. 

As London continues to grow in population, and with little sign of more land being released for housing construction, we will continue to see houses like this becoming the norm. 

For another inspiring project, don't miss: Neglected 160 m² loft gets second life.

What did you find most impressive about this project? 
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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