17th century house conversion, Tanners Hill

Alissa Ugolini—homify UK Alissa Ugolini—homify UK
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Completed in 2012, this wonderful 17th century, Grade II listed home underwent an incredible restoration and conversion. Located in Tanners Hill, the outside reveals signs about the era of the property, while the inside tells an astounding story of different architectural periods, design styles and absolutely mind-blowing interior details. It will come as no surprise to you that this home belongs to an art collector and gallerist when you see how it has all been put together. At this point, you'll understand why 25 Tanners Hill was awarded the prestigious RIBA London Regional Award in 2013, and has been shortlisted for a whole score of other awards. Take a look…

Project by Dow Jones Architects, photography by David Grandorge.

A historical front

The homes that reveal little about their internal layout or style for us, are the most interesting. This home in Deptford exemplifies that notion. Little would you know from the outside, but the inside of this home is riddled with interesting angles, design styles and a culmination of eras both past and present. 

The sitting area

The contrast between the inside and out is remarkable. Blurring the line between modernism and eclecticism, the designers have merged two distinctly different styles together to great effect. The positioning of the artwork in the glass hallway creates a gallery-like effect. This is coupled with the stunning choice of mid-century modern design furniture that simply oozes with style and class.

The dining room

The dining room bears a resemblance to the sitting room above, employing the furniture from a similar era. The different coloured chairs create variation in the space, furthering the artistic and creative feel already evidenced throughout the home. The sleek black dining room table is in direct contrast with the chairs, yet complements the overall design of the space perfectly. Even though the colour palette is moody and mysterious, the ample flow of light from the row of windows brightens up even the most hidden corners. 

The kitchen

The kitchen is astounding—we absolutely love the exposed brick wall and polished concrete countertop. It's almost as though the designers are paying homage to the past, painting over sections of the brick to refresh the space, yet leaving behind a bit of history as a constant reminder. The flow of light from the ceiling creates an ethereal glow, which is dispersed wonderfully by the neutral and muted colour palette. 

The bedroom

The bedroom simply oozes with Nordic charm. To the left of the image we see the same exposed brick wall seen above, yet in this instance, the remainder of the space has been rendered to a smooth, sleek finish. Void of overly decorative elements or busy patterns, this bedroom is a petite oasis of calm and serenity—two words that are much needed when living in a busy city. The sparse, stripped-back aura of this space works wonderfully, and is highlighted by the ample flow of natural light from the large square window.

The bathroom

The bathroom is a culmination of the themes evidenced throughout the house, with elements of stripped-back brick, exposed timber, tilework and eclectic, artistic elements. The designers have managed to fuse a rustic and modern theme together, through the clever use of decoration and fixed features. Most would shy away from such a challenge, but as you can see, the marriage of these two distinctly different styles has worked to great effect.

What is your favourite aspect of this 17th century house conversion? Let us know in the comments section below.
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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