London family house: traditional design

Alissa Ugolini—homify UK Alissa Ugolini—homify UK
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The house you are about to see in Chiswick, is the result of a wonderfully resolved and executed design by Mzo Tarr Architects. Titled Tetris, the family of this home had outgrown the current chalet bungalow, and wanted a new house to replace their dilapidated residence. Prior to Mzo Tarr Architects undertaking the work on the property, three failed attempts had been made by other architects. Not only this, but the bungalow contained a melange of 4 different architectural styles, requiring the architects to find a balance between modern, functional, and environmentally friendly design. It also required a solution to be found that both neighbours, planning authorities and conservation officers could be happy with—what a task indeed!

In the end, the final design boasts 4 storeys and 5 bedrooms, all tied together with a stunning cedar clad exterior. The name was given due to the pragmatically stacked rooms which enable natural light to penetrate each space throughout the day. In terms of sustainability, active and passive technologies have been adopted, including geothermal heating and rainwater harvesting. The main structure of the house is made from Structural Insulated Panels (SIP), clad with sustainably sourced Western Red Cedar and silicone render. The home defies form, shape and material quality, making it a true marvel of modern day architecture. Take a look…

The frontage

The view from the front of the property is a truly spectacular scene. Here, you can see the amalgamation of many different eras and design styles. The existing pitch of the property shows the history of the site, which has been wonderfully married to a modern bay window and bold timber construction. Though there is much going on, the architects have managed to combine such big differences to great effect, creating a home that is really like no other.

The rear

The rear of the home tells a different story; here, we see a largely modern structure and a stunning combination of white render, elongated timber panels and sleek black window frames. The orientation of the windows on this particular side of the property face due north, meaning the rooms inside, namely the study, are bathed in a constant flow of natural light.

The side view

Finally, we see the reflection pool and floating staircase in all their glory. Naturally, the cut out of the building is completed totally in glass, allowing both occupants and guests to see this stunning architectural feat. The translucency of this face, coupled with the floating nature of the staircase creates a truly unique and eye-catching feature. It really beckons us to see what's inside.

The floor plan

Ground floor plan:   by MZO TARR Architects
MZO TARR Architects

Ground floor plan

MZO TARR Architects

Before we take a brief look inside, let's take a moment to view the floor plan as it often reveals many things that aren't visible to the untrained eye. You can see the open nature of the property, which lacks heavy partitions and the unnecessary division of spaces. You can see the relationship of the reflection pool with the ground floor, and how that face of the building is stripped back and revealing.

The kitchen

To finish, we see a view of the minimalist kitchen towards the dining room. As you saw in the image of the floor plan above, only small divisions and partitions have been added between the rooms. This has allowed for a strong bond and communication between the various spaces, in turn, meaning the internal spatial layout is fluid and accessible.

To see another out of this world example of architecture in England, check out: A futuristic extension to a family home.

What is your favourite aspect of this home? Let us know in the comments section below.
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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