The see-through house

Caitlin Hughes Caitlin Hughes
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It's a divisive and controversial design: floor-to-ceiling glass windows and doors in place of more traditional exterior walls. However, the stunning visual effect created by a glass façade is undeniable, particularly when combined with clever lighting options which illuminate the whole building, as is demonstrated in today's unique project. Glass manufacturers Culmax have given this traditional family home a new twist that opens up the space and invites the outdoors in. Let's take a closer look…

A bright façade

Richmond, London:  Terrace by Maxlight
Maxlight

Richmond, London

Maxlight

The exterior is striking due to its almost transparent appearance. Large expanses of glass replace traditional brick walls, allowing us to see directly into the interiors, which are illuminated by a warm glow. The light which radiates from this house creates a star-like effect: the architecture stands out against the darkness of the sky and draws the focus from its less incandescent neighbours.  Not only are the front exterior walls almost entirely glass, but there is also a walk-on glass ceiling! The overall effect created by the combined materials and light is simply stunning, and is definitely best appreciated at night. 

The kitchen

Richmond, London:  Windows  by Maxlight
Maxlight

Richmond, London

Maxlight

The Maxlight sliding doors and oversized windows bring a whole new dimension to the kitchen. The glass visually and physically opens up the kitchen into the garden, creating a greater sense of space and a fresh, invigorating atmosphere inside. By removing the barriers to the outdoors, Culmax have created a stronger connection between the house and its surroundings which means the occupants never feel closed off from nature. 

Bringing the garden inside

Richmond, London:  Windows  by Maxlight
Maxlight

Richmond, London

Maxlight

Here we get a panoramic view of the garden, which appears to be framed by the borders of the glass windows and sliding doors. It's as though the greenery outdoors is a feature of the kitchen and the interior design scheme, as it dominates the entire back wall. The contrast of the green against the crisp white décor inside creates a vibrant and dynamic impression, and it just goes to show how combining two striking visual elements can be more effective than intricate and colourful interiors. 

Optical illusions

Richmond, London:  Corridor & hallway by Maxlight
Maxlight

Richmond, London

Maxlight

The floating timber stairs and glass balustrade, both from Culmax, are a fitting addition to the modern and minimalist interior. The design plays tricks on you, with the steps seemingly levitating in mid-air, thanks to their cantilevered appearance . Each individual step has been fixed to the glass balustrade to achieve this striking impression. 

Watching the world outside

Richmond, London:  Windows  by Maxlight
Maxlight

Richmond, London

Maxlight

The living area is minimal and cosy, which is undeniably a difficult balance to strike. The glass exterior allows natural light to flood in, creating a  summery, cheerful ambience emphasised by the indoor plants and neutral colour scheme. Shades of damson and lilac are introduced in the form of cushions to add depth to the mainly white room. This has also been achieved with a combination of textures. 

One feature in particular which stands out is the globe, taking centre stage atop the coffee table. It seems like a fitting metaphor for this house, which welcomes the outside world inside, and displays itself in a bold fashion to the world looking in. 

If you want to discover similar projects, take a look at the following ideabook: Alfresco dining at its finest.

Could you live in a house with a glass exterior like this? We look forward to find out what you think of this design!
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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