Getting rid of your concrete backyard and what to do with it

Alissa Ugolini—homify UK Alissa Ugolini—homify UK
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Many people are still stuck with a '60s and '70s mass-made concrete backyard that they both hate and don't know what to do with. Understandably, a large chunk of concrete is both unpleasant to look at and is a reasonably unusable surface for a garden, when it comes to children playing and gardening. This is why, today, we want to extend out advice on removal of these old burdens, advise you how, why, risks involved and what to do with it after. Also, for those of you in possession of one, we want to extend our advice to those in Victorian mass built houses that have the remnants of a lime heap buried 1 metre below the backyard.    

Getting rid of it

So you've finally made the decision to get it done, and now you're considering man power, cost and time. Well, of course this comes down to exactly how large your patio is. An area as large as the raised part of this garden would take a day or two to get rid of, even with hired hands. The use of pneumatic machinery will also be necessary in 99% of cases. You will need to hire a skip to put the refuge in regardless of whether you hire a professional

Make sure you are aware of the positions of such things as gas, water and electrical ground works before you start the projects, you can do this by consulting your district council. You should also be aware that most professionals, who you hire for the use of their machinery,  will want to do more than just the demolition job and actually be more interested in an all round project. You should take this into consideration when hiring your professional -not just cheep labour but also good, outstanding finished products too. Depending on the size of your patio, you're probably looking at anything from £500-£1000, including the rental of machinery, for the demolition alone.  

With the rental of heavy duty machinery, don't expect the place to look pretty! They will make a mess of your lawn or driveway! So be warned. This is especially true in the case of Victorian houses with lime heaps buried 1m below the backyard. If this is the case for you, then you will need to dig off the top layer first and then break up the, reasonably soft, lime underneath with a drill. This will not be the case for many of you though, as these are often buried deeper than you'll ever need to go to lay the new foundations of a patio/terrace/lawn, however it can be the case with extensions.  

New garden space!

Once the fires of your concrete hell have been safely quelled, you will now be preparing for what is next to come. Concrete slabs, ponds, lawns and verandas; the world of opportunity is yours! 

Your new world

Now you can play with your style and have no real boundaries that prohibit the length to with you can personalise your garden or backyard. Think about what you would really like to have there and how you do and would like to use it! Look at this canvas of a garden design, ready for personalisation and wacky styles! What a great idea!

Backyard transformations

Party garden in Sevenoaks, Kent: modern Garden by Earth Designs
Earth Designs

Party garden in Sevenoaks, Kent

Earth Designs

Now that horrible concrete sea is gone, you can show off your new-found freedom to the neighbours and your friends and a dark, plain and even boring space could, with a little magic, transform itself into something like this; a singular urban paradise. 

If you liked this ideabook, take a look at our magazine, full of great ideas and living tips! Or, for more garden tips, take a look at our ideabook garden lighting.

Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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