The old corn mill

Caitlin Hughes Caitlin Hughes
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The Isle of Anglesey in North Wales is known for it's mysterious Celtic history, beautiful scenery, and the percentage of people who speak Welsh—a language which is now receiving more and more governmental support to allow it to thrive. Llannerch-y-Medd is a small village on the Isle of Angelsey which is home to today's project: a beautifully restored Mill, which lay abandoned for many years before it was bought by its present owners, and transformed with the help of Capra Architects. The project required some delicate negotiations to be undertaken, as the building is heritage listed and particular aspects of the property, including the water wheel and the mill shaft, had to be preserved. Let's take a look at the finished result..

Esgob Mill

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales : rustic Houses by Capra Architects
Capra Architects

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales

Capra Architects

The first thing we notice as we approach the site is the unusual water wheel which dominates the side of the building. This charming original feature has been carefully restored to its former glory, and really helps to define the character of this historical home. At homify, we always enjoy seeing projects which celebrate the heritage and previous uses of converted buildings, and this is no exception. To ensure that the old and new aspects of the home merge seamlessly, the majority of materials used have been sourced locally or reclaimed. As the restoration work was so successfully carried out, it was also possible to make some alterations and extend the property: an additional stone building follows on from the original section of the home, and is now used as a holiday home.

Courtyard

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales : rustic Houses by Capra Architects
Capra Architects

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales

Capra Architects

Although Anglesey isn't necessarily known for its good weather, there are moments of summer sunshine to be enjoyed—and this outdoor area is the perfect spot for it! Protected from the wind, yet exposed to the sun (when it feels like shining), this courtyard area is simple but stylish. Flourishes of green and floral features brighten up the space, comprised of natural Welsh stone slabs. The lawn introduces extra life and colour to the space, and is the perfect place for the children to play and pets to roam free.

Spiral staircase

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales : rustic Corridor, hallway & stairs by Capra Architects
Capra Architects

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales

Capra Architects

A feature staircase has been wrapped around the original mill shaft, drawing attention to the purpose and history of the property. The spiral staircase is in keeping with the traditional interiors, and is made from timber which has most likely been locally sourced. The iron and steel balustrades introduce a modern touch to the design, but don't overpower the traditional, rustic theme which runs throughout the home. White walls keep the interior spaces feeling fresh and light, and help to balance out the warmer tones of the floorboards and exposed beams.

The upper floor

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales : rustic Corridor, hallway & stairs by Capra Architects
Capra Architects

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales

Capra Architects

The winding staircase leads us up to the upper level of the home, and we can see how the top of the mill shaft has been turned into a focal feature. The balustrades and exposed timber ceiling beams frame the restored mill shaft, and the design of the whole rooms flows and centres around the preserved structure. Traditional, rustic decor has been chosen: simple wooden furniture and neutral colours are the perfect match to maintain a simple, traditional image. 

The front yard

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales : rustic Houses by Capra Architects
Capra Architects

Melin Esgob, Llannerch-y-Medd, North Wales

Capra Architects

Before we draw this brief tour to a close, we take one last look at the front yard. The area has been landscaped, with timber decking forming a crescent shape. Small pebbles fill the half-moon area, providing a place for additional features to be displayed, including a miniature water wheel, and what appears to be part of a well. From this perspective, we can also better appreciate the beautiful views over the lush Welsh countryside which are on offer.

If you've enjoyed this project, be sure to take a look at the following ideabook: The house of 100 colours.

What do you think of this restoration project? Leave a comment & let us know!
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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