Curved & rounded facades

Alissa Ugolini—homify UK Alissa Ugolini—homify UK
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Have you ever thought, ’Why are homes mostly square?’ Is it because we are simply accustomed to placing our furniture in corners and niches? Actually, builders loathe building in circular forms. It is harder to construct, design and render—even the glazing of these homes causes issues. In addition, it is not a space-saving method of design by any means.

Nonetheless, don't let this put you off. If you want to think outside of the box (literally and figuratively), then you will love these round and curved facades, which are anything but ordinary.

Timber prefab

Polish architect Robert Konciezcny proves with his design that even wooden houses can be round. To our surprise, this is actually a prefabricated house and of course, is a far more environmentally friendly option than concrete or polystyrene. On top of this, you cannot overlook the environmental benefits that come from a wooden construction; it provides good thermal insulation against various climatic conditions.

The round design of the house fits beautifully with its landscape. Especially in this rural area as it quietly mimics the shape of a grain silo. This is an extraordinary example of architecture and a wonderful use of natural materials.

Organic forms

Italian architect Luca Curci wants to create yet another stunning example of architecture for the already growing skyline of the United Arab Emirates. This building was inspired by organic forms, in particular, beehives. With a plot size of 15 million square metres, this development contains both a residential and business premises, as well as a wellness facility. 

Optical tricks

 Houses by Jakob+MacFarlane
Jakob+MacFarlane

Hérold—100 logements sociaux // Paris

Jakob+MacFarlane

Are these houses billowing and swinging in the wind? Did you have to look twice? The trick lies in the design of the exterior facade: the protruding surfaces of the balconies were designed so that the body of the building appears bowed from afar. This creates a wave-like shape, which looks equally as mind-blowing and dynamic from up close.

Loopy

Adding circular and round decorative shapes to the external facade of a building can create a wonderful effect. Constructing with curves can be a costly venture, but when you can just as easily add contrasting elements to the exterior, you can fool even the most discerning eye into thinking there  is much more going on than just linear planes and straight surfaces.

Mimicking nature

Creating balance and harmony with nature is always synonymous with round design. In this case, a grass roof and carefully constructed garden with lagoon, helps to blend the house into its landscape. The reflection of the house in the water is interesting, it looks like a bubble both as a mirror image and in real life.

Waves

Curved design is not limited to residential buildings. Commercial design has followed suit, and is now expressing natural forms in what is normally a rather mechanically dominated field. Boulevard Berlin does just that, playing with forms that emulate waves and an ocean breeze. A beautiful shopping experience for locals and tourists alike, and a construction that will be remembered by all.

To see more stunning examples of architecture see ’A relationship between house and landscape and Key architectural movements of the 20th & 21st century’.

What do you think of organic design? Would you implement curved elements into a future build?
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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