Glass box extension on thatched cottage:  Kitchen units by Kitchen Architecture

​How to create the perfect Feng Shui kitchen

Johannes van Graan Johannes van Graan
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When it comes to the ancient Chinese practice of Feng Shui, the kitchen remains exactly what it is to all of us in everyday life: the heart of the home. Feng Shui just goes a bit deeper and teaches us that the kitchen symbolizes health, abundance, and even wealth. 

Thus, it’s not only the room where we cook and dine, but also one of the three most important areas of the home (along with the front entryway and the master bedroom). 

But whether you believe in Feng Shui or not, it can’t be denied that this practice does make sense in terms of furniture layout and décor choices. And if your kitchen layout can contribute to positive energy and a welcoming vibe, then why not, right?

Let’s see how to go about creating the perfect Feng Shui kitchen…

1. The history of the Feng Shui kitchen

Nobilia Project 6 Xeno 20mm high gloss door in anthracite and Flash 20mm high gloss door in white: modern Kitchen by Eco German Kitchens
Eco German Kitchens

Nobilia Project 6 Xeno 20mm high gloss door in anthracite and Flash 20mm high gloss door in white

Eco German Kitchens

The ancient Chinese already believed that the area in the home where food was prepared needed to be maintained as a safe, well-designed, and healthful space. Thus, various Feng Shui guidelines were established. 

But keep in mind that things have changed (a lot) since those ancient times. For one thing, we no longer cook over open fires. Modern kitchens opt for more convenient methods like stoves and microwaves, which means certain antique beliefs are no longer applicable.

However, a lot of Feng Shui kitchen rules still apply today…

2. The right colours for your Feng Shui kitchen

Modern German Kitchen - Kitchen Design Surrey: modern Kitchen by Raycross Interiors
Raycross Interiors

Modern German Kitchen—Kitchen Design Surrey

Raycross Interiors

The best colours for a Feng Shui kitchen support the energy generated in the space. And while some can be flaunted freely, others should be used sparingly. 

• Green and brown. The fire element is always present in the kitchen, and this is fuelled by the wood element. Both green and brown are wood colours, which can be used together or separately. 

• Yellow. This cheery tone, an earth element colour, can help to limit the potency of the fire element in the kitchen.  

• Red. A colour which represents the fire element and must be used sparingly. 

• Orange and water colours. In the destructive cycle, water destroys fire. Therefore, be sure to maintain a colour balance when bringing orange (fire) into your kitchen. Blue (water) is the ideal contrasting / complementary colour, making for a striking design.  

• Blue and black. The two water element colours which can style up a kitchen, but must balance each other rather perfectly. 

When choosing the main colour scheme for your kitchen, consider the appropriate accent colour based on element colours. Use accent tints that support the main element hue within the productive cycle, such as: 

• Water (blue and black) nourishes wood (green and brown). 

• Wood feeds fire (red, pink, orange, purple). 

• Fire creates earth (tan, yellow). 

• Earth creates metal (white, gold, silver). 

• Metal draws water (blue and black).

It is recommended to use accent colours for trim, small appliances, or decorative elements.

3. The Feng Shui kitchen: Pay attention to lighting

Glass box extension on thatched cottage:  Kitchen units by Kitchen Architecture
Kitchen Architecture

Glass box extension on thatched cottage

Kitchen Architecture

As the kitchen is one of the first spaces a person goes to each morning, it’s a good idea to keep it as cheerful and “sunny” as possible. Even science backs this up by telling us that direct exposure to sunlight produces serotonin and melatonin, which stimulates the mood.  

So, if your kitchen isn’t basking in an abundance of natural light, see if you can’t remedy the situation with bigger windows, glass doors, or even a skylight or two.

4. The Feng Shui kitchen: Ensure everything works properly

Wandsworth: classic Kitchen by Lewis Alderson
Lewis Alderson

Wandsworth

Lewis Alderson

Everything from appropriately sharp knives to cupboard doors that close properly is vital for a successfully designed Feng Shui kitchen. So, for those who are clinging onto those chipped coffee mugs (and soup bowls… ), either fix them or toss them.

5. The Feng Shui kitchen: Respect your stove

Heritage: modern Kitchen by Mowlem&Co
Mowlem&Co

Heritage

Mowlem&Co

The kitchen stove is a particularly significant Feng Shui symbol of wealth. As such, it needs to be kept clean and in excellent condition. When using, rotate through the stovetop elements (burners) to distribute the energy evenly.

homify hint: Hang a mirror above your stove if the space under your range hood is dark. Not only will this help to reflect light, but Feng Shui teaches us that the mirror will place the person cooking at the stove in the “command position” and allow them to see what’s behind them – a very powerful position in Feng Shui.

6. The Feng Shui kitchen: Keep it clean

Large Island and Appliance Wall: modern Kitchen by ADORNAS KITCHENS
ADORNAS KITCHENS

Large Island and Appliance Wall

ADORNAS KITCHENS

Feng Shui always places great importance on cleanliness, especially in spaces that involve health. Thus, devote a little more time in wiping down those surfaces (from countertops and walls to backsplashes) every day, dusting off drawers and cupboards, sweeping and mopping floors, etc.

7. The Feng Shui kitchen: Avoid clutter

Canterbury | A Vision In Green : classic Kitchen by Davonport
Davonport

Canterbury | A Vision In Green

Davonport

Countertops in the kitchen have a tendency to collect accessories from everyday life – mail, pamphlets, take-out menus, children’s toys, cellular phone chargers, etc. Feng Shui tells us that only things that are used often (daily or up to three times a week) should reside on those countertops. 

Everything else will only add to a cluttered look and should be kept in a kitchen cupboard or closet.

8. The Feng Shui kitchen: Include the wood element

Stunning Traditional family home: country Kitchen by PTC Kitchens
PTC Kitchens

Stunning Traditional family home

PTC Kitchens

Many modern kitchens have fire (stove), water (sink), metal (appliances), and earth (colour) represented, yet wood seems to be missing from a lot of them. But don’t think that you should redo your cabinetry or anything like that in order to include this element.

Incorporating wood could be something as subtle as placing fruit in a wooden bowl on the counter, or leaving a wooden cutting board / butcher block on the kitchen island. Even something as simple as a potted plant or a painting of plants, trees or forests can do the trick.

9. The Feng Shui kitchen: Hide the knives

In-Line Calla in Magnolia White. With the worktops are Silestone Haiku and Spekva Brasilica Safari.: modern Kitchen by Zara Kitchen Design
Zara Kitchen Design

In-Line Calla in Magnolia White. With the worktops are Silestone Haiku and Spekva Brasilica Safari.

Zara Kitchen Design

It’s a fact that knives make most people feel uncomfortable, and Feng Shui recognises that. So, while it might be trendy to store knives along a wall-mounted magnetic strip or in a butcher block, a proper Feng Shui kitchen will have its knives out of sight in a drawer. Much cleaner and much safer! 

Want to keep the positive energy flowing throughout your home? Let’s continue by Experimenting with Feng Shui in the bedroom.

Did we convince you to Feng Shui your kitchen?
Whitton Drive:  Terrace house by GK Architects Ltd

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