Guide to external cladding: detached home by building with frames | homify
Guide to External Cladding:  Detached home by Building With Frames
Guide to External Cladding:  Detached home by Building With Frames
Guide to External Cladding:  Detached home by Building With Frames
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Create impact and protect your home with the latest external surface materials:

Exterior cladding is the thin skin of material on the outer face of a building, providing visual detail and weather resistance. Common options include wood, brick and stone, with zinc, aluminium and wood-effect fibre cement becoming increasingly popular.

Cladding has many advantages; along-lasting, low-maintenance finish is assured; properties can better blend in with their surroundings, and purposeful design statements can be created.

Defining architecture:

External materials are often combined to create a blend of colours, textures and profiles, with installations in horizontal, vertical or angled patterns. The right fusion can highlight architectural details and define the shape and form of a house; it can also lessen the visual mass of a large property. ‘Planners often like a building to be clad in various materials so that it breaks down the bulk of the forms.

Pleasing the planners:

Local authorities may require a new extension to blend in with the original house – or it may be permitted to stand apart with contrasting materials.

Beautifying buildings:

Timber or metal cladding is one way to turn an ugly-duckling house into a beautiful property. Homes built in the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties, with their generous proportions but less appealing appearances, are often targeted for such makeovers.

Retro fitting new cladding brings added benefits. There’s the opportunity to increase thermal performance with no loss of internal space. This works particularly well on Twenties and Thirties houses built with solid brick walls where there’s no cavity for insulation. A sustainable, external timber clad skin – such as vertical cedar boards – with insulation underneath and new double or triple-glazed windows can make a huge difference both thermally and visually.

The best material for you:

Timber cladding has warmth and character and is usually made from larch, cedar, or Thermowood. Species such as cedar and larch can be left untreated because they inherently resist decay and moisture; they weather to silvery grey and can last about 30 years.

(Attached are some images of external cladding to full, side and end elevations. Also some before and after images).

Colour: Wood effect
Material: Wood
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